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Tuesday, May 24, 2011

Joplin, Missouri: Finding Its Way Back

WALL STREET JOURNAL: THE THREE BILLION-DOLLAR TORNADO

NY TIMES: 1500 RESIDENTS STILL MISSING IN JOPLIN



LET THIS NEVER BE YOU:












KANSAS CITY STAR: STORIES FROM THE SURVIVORS

KOMO-TV: HARSH REALITY IN PICTURES

WALL STREET JOURNAL: PHOTOS, AUDIO, VIDEO AND A COMPREHENSIVE REPORT

SIOUX FALLS OFFERS HELP

KANSAS CITY ROYALS DONATE $25,000 TO JOPLIN RELIEF EFFORT



GUARDIAN (UK): JOPLIN WANTS AN IMPROVED WARNING SYSTEM

I cry for Missouri...the State that doesn't have time to weep for itself today...

We still have such a long way to go: To build cities that are tornado-proof and to provide a better early warning system in every tornado-prone city in the United States. Right now, Joplin, Missouri is making those two points perfectly clear.

There wasn't enough time to provide an adequate warning before that powerful and fast-moving juggernaut came roaring in. The beautiful (and it was) City of Joplin was nowhere near prepared to take that kind of a hit.

Now, 75% of the City is in ruins and, as Joplin turns around and rebuilds, the cost to insure everything is going to skyrocket.

Too many people died. That is a fact that transcends the dollars in the hearts and minds of those who survived.

A proper weather-monitoring and early warning system should be established in every highly-populated and tornado-prone area in the United States. It is my opinion that our Country must take care of its own, first. I consider this latest disaster in Joplin to be a National wake-up call.

Too many people in Joplin just didn't know where to go or what to do. And we, as a society, are using phones now that are better-designed than many city emergency game plans.

Even Joplin's hospital building was badly damaged. And that is just plain wrong.

A hospital building, with staff and equipment, is crucial in this type of scenario. I reaize that the sustained wind speed reached almost 200 miles an hour in Joplin. But a better-designed, stronger structure will always make a serious difference in any community.

Another line of storms might wreak havoc today or tonight in parts of the United States. I pray, with sincerity, that everyone will make it through them, unscathed this time.

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